Accessible Instruments

Happy New Year everyone. 2016 is finally here. How has your year been going so far? I hope it has been going well and you are starting off the new year in good spirits. I was pondering on what to write. So, I have decided to write about accessible instruments. With the right accommodations, it is possible to play a musical instrument when you have a disability. Music is so beautiful. It is a great form of self- expression. I have a history with music. When I was younger, my parents signed me up to take piano lessons. It was amazing to learn an instrument. Personally, I wanted to learn how to play the harp or the violin. They are really my favorite. They have such a soothing melody when they are being played. I love it. I also have a background with singing. During my first year of high school, I joined the choir and was a soprano there. I participated in many concerts at my school. Dang, I wish I could find a picture that was taken of me singing at one of the concerts. It would be perfect. I’ve always had a good singing voice since I was a young girl. I would sing any song. Still to this day, I can sing freely. I should have auditioned for American Idol. Too little, too late though. The series have ended. I’m kidding about that. But, there is a shy part about me singing when asked though. I’m working on it. My dad always ask me all of the time if I could rejoin the choir. Hmm, I’m still thinking about that. 

I saw where HemiHelp had an article about how their clients were learning how to play the recorder one- handedly. It was intriguing. With the HemiHelp organization, the music therapist assists the children in their efforts of playing instruments and make the necessary adaptations where needed. The goal is to have each child be treated just like other students who do not have any physical limitations. There are ways to make accommodations for children and/or even adults wanting to learn others such as the drum, guitar, trombone, piano, and many more. In some cases, it may even help with the movement in their limbs. It can definitely be used as a therapeutic approach. I found an article on different people’s perspectives and experiences with playing different types of instruments, as well as an article on how to adapt a recorder for someone with cerebral palsy. All of this information can be found HERE.  

Pictures of some instruments that can be modified for those living with a disability.

Photo by: Eco- Babyz

Photo by: Eco- Babyz

Photo by: Children’s Hemiplegia and Stroke Association

Photo by: Children’s Hemiplegia and Stroke Association

Photo by: Children’s Hemiplegia and Stroke Association

Photo by: Children’s Hemiplegia and Stroke Association

Photo by: Children’s Hemiplegia and Stroke Association

Photo by: Children’s Hemiplegia and Stroke Association

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This entry was published on January 14, 2016 at 9:10 am. It’s filed under Blog and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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